212 results
 PNG Conservation and Environment Protection Authority

Essays and research papers on Gender and Gender related issues in PNG

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 PNG Conservation and Environment Protection Authority

Highlights the urgent, unmet medical and emotional needs of survivors of family and sexual violence in Papua New Guinea and recommends concrete action in order to meet these needs.

 PNG Conservation and Environment Protection Authority

The New Guinea Challenge - Development and Conservation in Societies of Great Cultural and Biological diversity

 PNG Conservation and Environment Protection Authority,  PNG Department of National Planning & Monitoring

The Government of PNG through the National Executive Council (NEC) Decision No. 135/2010 deliberated on the lack of core statistics for informed decision-making and evidence-based planning and as a result directed relevant Government departments responsible for producing and using statistics to develop a National Strategy for the Development of Statistics (NSDS) for the country.

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 PNG Department of National Planning & Monitoring

Papua New Guinea Strategy for the Development of Statistics 2018 - 2027

With 3.8 million cubic meters of tropical wood exported in 2014, primarily to China, Papua New Guinea (PNG) has become the world’s largest exporter of tropical wood, surpassing Malaysia, which had held the top spot for the
past several decades.

Tropical forestry and logging are complex subjects, encompassing a range of diffi cult issues, including land ownership, the sustainability of natural resources, the impact on climate change, the social and economic impact of logging on isolated and relatively untouched, subsistence sector communities, and the protection of the basic rights of the people concerned.

Papua New Guinea’s (PNG) forests and forestry have played an important role in the livelihoods of the people of the country for many years. Forests have provided a source for food, fruits and nuts, building materials, medicinal plants, habitats for refuge and a wealth of other services.

The history of agriculture in PNG is about 10 000 years old. This history is reviewed here in the context of 50 000 years of human occupation of the Australia – New Guinea region. 1 More is known about what has happened nearer to the present, especially since 1870, than about the distant past. Much of the early history (prehistory) of PNG was unknown until about 50 years ago, but since 1959 there has been a lot of research on the prehistory of PNG, with a major focus on agriculture.

Midway up the slopes of the Andogoro, Moirutapa, and Kundiman mountains that rise up from the surrounding floodplains and separate East Sepik Province from Enga and Western Highlands Provinces in Papua New Guinea, are the traditional settlements of the Upland Arafundi people (Roscoe & Telban 2004:94). Galleries of stencils adorn the walls of caves once used as spirit houses and shelters by the Upland Arafundi people. In the limestone caves they buried their dead, initiated young men, and sheltered from their enemies.

Two of the unanswered questions of Papua New Guinea prehistory are: (1) whether agriculture was present in the mid-Holocene not only in the highlands but also in the lowlands and Bismarck Archipelago and (2)whether the presence of agriculture might have been influenced by interaction between these regions. This paper addresses these questions through an analysis of prehistoric stone mortars, pestles and figures, which hold information on both style and function.

This is an economic evaluation of the compensation to which Papua New Guinea’s customary landholders -wrongly dispossessed through Special Agricultural Business Leases (SABL) - might be entitled if they successfully sued the government. The evaluation involves the calculation of commercial loss but also, and probably more importantly, economic equivalent value loss. The framework identifies the relevant heads of value (not just priced transactions) and demonstrates appropriate methods for valuation. It does not pretend to be a price calculator but rather a tool for advocacy.

This paper investigates the real financial consequences of investing in land with disputed tenure rights. It demonstrates that companies which ignore the issue of land tenure expose themselves to substantial, and in some cases extreme, risks. Using case study analysis, the paper connects ground-up financial thinking with empirical reality. In so doing, it makes a strong case for the need to integrate tenure-related risks more comprehensively into our financial architecture.

Land is life. For the rural peoples of the world, especially in the Global South, our relationship with land extends
beyond cultivation and producing food. It anchors our community, from its fertile womb stems our culture, and from
its depths our struggle for justice. Today, are faced with worsening global hunger, intensifying famines, and escalating land-related conflicts at thebackdrop of continuing massive land and resource grabbing.

Papua New Guinea’s Post Courier newspaper reported that the National Court had just overturned a decision made by a provincial land court magistrate in 2006. The decision in question was meant to resolve a dispute between two members of a Huli clan about the ownership of land in the Moran petroleum development licence area, which is one of eight licence areas that now form part of the PNG Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) project.
But it seems that the magistrate ‘mistakenly’ granted one of the disputing parties

THE present paper discusses a form of social classification which may be referred to provisionally as sex affiliation. The essence of it is that male children are classed with their father's group and female children with their mother's. I shall first endeavour to give an account, in its more or less relevant aspects, of the social organization of the people among whom this sex affiliation is practised; after that we may discuss the practice itself in greater detail and consider its implications.

The rock paintings, the subject of this communication, were discovered near Bomana in the neighbourhood of Port Moresby, Central District of Papua (British New Guinea).

Government Anthropologist, Papua. 1 In MAN, 1923, 119, I published some notes on Rock Paintings from New Guinea. In the following, I have described further examples which were discovered during the month of September, 1922. These were found in the Sogeri district inland from Port Moresby and near the village of Nahatana, some twenty miles further inland than the previous finds. Three distinct stations were visited, and almost obliterated signs of paintings were seen in one other place.

The present paper discusses a form of social classification which may be referred to provisionally as sex affiliation. The essence of it is that male children are classed with their father's group and female children with their mother's. I shall first endeavour to give an account, in its more or less relevant. aspects, of the social organization of the people among whom this sex affiliation is practised; after that we may discuss the practice itself in greater detail and consider
its implications.

This paper deals with the rock-paintings and rock-carvings of Papua. The sites hitherto discovered are not very numerous and the paintings and carvings are crude in the extreme, nevertheless, they deserve more attention than they have received; and while we may look for a much greater accumulation of evidence in the future, it should not be amiss at present to attempt a provisional survey.